The Trace Element Iron

Author: Theres Eisenreich ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published: 6. July 2022‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated: 6. July 2022

 

The Trace Element Iron

Iron is not only the most common metal found on the earth's surface, but it is also a vital trace element without which we cannot exist. It is involved in various processes in the body, but one of its main tasks is to contribute to the transport of oxygen through the organism.

What Exactly Does Our Body Need Iron For?

Our body cannot produce iron itself, so we have to take it in through our food. The intestine is the central absorption point for the trace element. It occurs in various compounds, but only the bivalent (Fe2+) and trivalent (Fe3+) iron are important for our body.

Iron is an essential building block of haemoglobin (red blood pigment) and is therefore significantly involved in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the corresponding tissues. Excess iron is stored in the muscles, liver and spleen, among other places. If there is enough iron, it contributes to physical and mental performance and reduces tiredness and fatigue. It also ensures healthy functioning of the immune system and is involved in cell division.

In addition, iron plays an outstanding role in signal transmission between the nerve cells. Here, neurotransmitters are the messenger substances through which the nerve cells communicate with each other. Iron is involved in the production of these neurotransmitters.

Schaubild zu den Wirkungsweisen von Eisen im Körper

Risk Groups For Iron Deficiency

An iron deficiency can occur above all in special life situations or circumstances. The risk group primarily includes women of childbearing age who menstruate regularly and perhaps heavily. In addition, pregnancy and breastfeeding also require more of the trace element. Therefore, special attention is paid here gynaecologically.

But competitive athletes, especially those in the endurance field, also have a particular tendency to iron deficiency. Microhaemorrhages in the tissue can be to blame, but increased muscular strain, increased sweating and reduced iron absorption in the intestine due to constant physical stress can also promote an iron deficiency.

Due to their diet, vegetarians and vegans also belong to the risk group for iron deficiency, as they lack animal foods as well-bioavailable sources of iron. But people who donate blood, are chronically ill or have had an operation also belong to the risk group for iron deficiency, as do growing children or babies who are not breastfed.

Difference: Iron Deficiency And Iron Deficiency Anaemia

One speaks of an iron deficiency when the body has too little of the trace element for its daily needs. Sometimes it happens that the usual diet does not cover the amount of iron needed. The daily iron requirement is also increased in the special (life) situations mentioned above. All these factors can lead to an iron deficiency and subsequently to a disorder of the iron metabolism. An iron deficiency can occur when:

• You lose a lot of iron, for example during menstruation or other bleeding periods
• You have an increased need for iron, such as during pregnancy or breastfeeding
• Iron absorption is reduced, as can be the case with vegan or vegetarian diets

Iron deficiency anaemia, also called anaemia, describes a disorder of the entire haematopoietic system, which can develop due to an iron deficiency. The red blood cells and haemoglobin are reduced because the previous iron deficiency causes a disturbance in the production of the red blood pigment haemoglobin.

Iron deficiency and the symptoms

These symptoms can indicate an iron deficiency, among other things:

• Frequent fatigue
• Powerlessness
• Lack of concentration
• Frequent headaches
• Sleeping disorders
• Fast heartbeat
• Shortness of breath during exertion/sport
• Brittle nails and hair as well as hair loss
• Torn corners of the mouth (rhagades)
• Paleness

Anyone who observes these symptoms should have a blood check done by a doctor or therapist to detect or rule out an iron deficiency.

Übersicht der Symptome eines Eisenmangels

Avoid self-diagnosis of iron deficiency

As the table below shows, boys and men need less iron than girls and women from the age of 10. For this reason, the male sex should at best not take iron in addition without a doctor's instruction. But girls and women should not diagnose themselves with an iron deficiency simply because they have a few typical symptoms. A blood count and a therapeutic recommendation for additional iron supplementation should be made in advance.

These parameters can be checked when an iron deficiency is suspected

To be sure that an iron deficiency is really present, a look is taken at the blood serum, the blood plasma or even the whole blood, depending on the parameter examined.

Haemoglobin

Iron-containing protein; red blood pigment and main component of red blood cells

Normal values:
Women: 115-160 g/l
Men: 135-178 g/l

Haematocrit

Percentage of all blood cells in total blood

Normal values:
Women: 36-48 vol%
Men: 40-53 vol%

Transferrin 

Transport protein of iron in the blood to transport it to the tissues.

Normal values:
Transferrin: 2.0-3.6 g/l
Transferrin saturation* : 16-45 %.
Soluble transferrin receptor**: 0.8-2.3 mg/l

* Indicates how much of the transport protein has iron bound, how "saturated" it is.
** Is responsible for transporting transferrin into the cell.

Ferritin 

Protein molecule within cells that can store iron; each ferritin molecule can store about 4,000 iron molecules.

Normal values:
Women:
16-19 years: 10-163 µg/l
20-60 years: 9-140 µg/l
over 60 years: ≥ 13 µg/l

Men:
16-19 years: 12-178 µg/l
20-60 years: 18-360 µg/l
over 60 years: ≥ 21 µg/l

Iron Requirement Per Day - Who Needs How Much?

Ideally, we get iron regularly from our food. The intestine is the central point of absorption of the trace element. It occurs in various compounds, but only the bivalent (Fe2+) and the trivalent (Fe3+) iron are important for our body. Unlike most other minerals, the requirement for iron changes over the course of a lifetime and is also dependent on gender:

Infants and children
Infants
(0 to under 4 months)
0.5 mg/day
Infants
(4 to under 12 months)
8 mg/day
Children
(1 to under 7 years)
8 mg/day
Children
(7 to under 10 years)
10 mg/day
Boys and girls
Boys (10 to under 15 years)  12 mg/day
Girls (10 to under 15 years) 15 mg/day
Adolescents and adults
Male adolescents (15 to under 19 years) 12 mg/day
Male adults (19 years and over) 10 mg/day
Female adolescents and adults (15 to under 51 years) 15 mg/day
Female adults (51 years and over) 10 mg/day
Pregnant and breastfeeding women
Pregnant women 30 mg/day
Breastfeeding women 20 mg/day

Foods Containing Iron

People who eat a balanced diet usually automatically have a lot of iron-rich foods on their plates. Nevertheless, some provide more, others less of the vital substance. We will take a closer look at which foods have which iron levels in the following:

Plant-based foods Iron content (mg)
per 100 g food
Cocoa powder (lightly de-oiled) 12.0 - 15.0
Millet 9.0
Lentils 7.5
Chickpeas 6.9
Peas 5.2
Oatmeal 4.6
Green spelt 4.2
Spinach 4.1
Wholemeal bread 3.15
Animal foods Iron content (mg)
per 100 g food
Pork liver 18.0
Beef liver 7.1
Oysters 6.25
Blood sausage 6.1
Pork tenderloin 3.0
Turkey 3.0
Cured pork 2.5
Beef fillet 2.3
Eggs 2.1

Iron From Plant Or Animal Sources - What Is The Difference?

As you can see in the overview, the important trace element iron is contained in many foods - and especially in plant-based foods. Now, as a vegan or vegetarian, you might say: "Great, that's no problem to cover my daily requirement through food!" Unfortunately, it's not that simple. Because animal iron is actually much more bioavailable, i.e. better absorbed by the body, than iron from plant sources.

In the various foods, iron is present in two forms: as non-haem iron (mostly trivalent iron, Fe3+) and as haem iron (divalent iron, Fe2+, as a complex with the haem pigment of haemoglobin). Now, however, haem iron is better absorbed by the body and this is found exclusively in animal foods. In plants, only non-haem iron is present. This iron (mostly Fe3+) has to share its transporter in the intestinal cell membrane with other substances (for example, with zinc or magnesium) after conversion to Fe2+ and the body can therefore absorb it less easily. However, the intestinal cells have their own transporter for haem, and thus also for haem iron, so that this form of iron is better absorbed.

Vitamin C Can Improve Iron Absorption In The Body

To improve the body's absorption of non-haem iron from plant foods, vitamin C is the keyword. When iron-rich foods are combined with vitamin C-containing foods, the vitamin ensures that the iron is converted into a form that can be directly absorbed by the intestine. For example, vegetables containing vitamin C, such as kale, peppers or broccoli, or a glass of orange juice (pressed by oneself or as direct juice) with a meal are good choices. However, in order to actually positively influence iron absorption through vitamin C, a meal should contain at least 25 mg of the vitamin, preferably even more. This corresponds to about 100 g of ripe tomatoes or the same amount of raspberries.

Good to know: Sensitive vitamin C

If there is one thing that the valuable vitamin C does not like, it is high heat, long storage and a lot of light. All this drastically reduces the vitamin C content of a food. Therefore, gentle cooking or raw consumption and direct consumption after shopping of fruits and vegetables is highly recommended.

What Can Inhibit Iron Absorption?

However, iron absorption, especially from plant sources, can also be blocked. Here, the composition of the food during a meal plays a major role. For example, dairy products or also tannins from tea and coffee can hinder iron absorption. Oxalic acid, which is contained in rhubarb, among other things, also binds iron and makes it unusable for the body.

What Should You Look Out For When Taking Iron Tablets Or Capsules?

If you have a low iron status and want to take a preparation to safely replenish your stores, you should make sure that the preparation is well tolerated. Many iron products have a negative effect on the gastrointestinal tract and cause complaints such as stomach pain or constipation.

In addition, the dosage and release of iron also play an important role: Depending on the need and also deficiency state, the preparation should ensure a sufficient supply of iron, which is, however, released slowly. This is gentler on the digestive tract and prevents too much free iron from entering the bloodstream. If the iron is released too quickly, there is more iron in the blood than can be bound by transferrin (iron transporter). Consequently, free iron remains in the blood, which promotes the formation of harmful oxygen radicals (oxidative stress).

Die Verträglichkeit eines Eisenproduktes ist für den Magen-Darm-Trakt wichtig.

Discover The Iron Product From Tisso:
Pro Ferra Ferment

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Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Tisso Telefon+49 27 62 98 36 – 20 08

If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally.
You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00 h.

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Lactoferrin


Author: Theres Eisenreich ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published: May 3rd 2022‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated: May 3rd 2022

Lactoferrin

Lactoferrin

Well protected since the
beginning of time

Hardly anything works as effectively and (mostly) secretly in the background as our immune system. For millions of years, ever since humans have existed, it has been trying to maintain our health and keep diseases of all kinds away from us. It is supported by complex immune structures and numerous substances, some of which the body can even produce itself, such as lactoferrin.

What is lactoferrin?

Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, antiviral and antimicrobial immune protein and part of the innate immune system. It belongs to the so-called glycoproteins of the transferrin family. This means that it can bind iron to itself and thus also contributes to a balanced iron metabolism. And with this we are almost on the trail of the naming of lactoferrin: Since it mainly occurs in (mother's) milk, the name is composed of lacto = milk and ferrin = iron.

An all-rounder protein -
how does lactoferrin work?

Strengthens the defences

Lactoferrin is released by mucous membranes and some glandular tissues, as well as by neutrophil granulocytes (certain immune cells). The latter are attracted to the site of inflammation and release lactoferrin there. It attaches itself to viruses, bacteria and to toxic components of the bacterial surface and neutralises them.

Lactoferrin also has immunomodulating and thus positive properties for our body's defences: on the one hand, lactoferrin can have a pro-inflammatory effect where this is just naturally needed, and on the other hand, it can also resolve an inflammation, which is particularly important in cases of silent inflammation, for example. In addition, in the case of an infection, it ensures that the balance between the elimination of pathogens and tolerance to the body's own tissue is maintained.

Supports iron balance and intestinal health

As mentioned above, lactoferrin can bind iron to itself, which is advantageous, for example, in the case of an infestation with pathogens: if these invaders are deprived of iron, this also inhibits their growth and further development. At the same time, lactoferrin improves the distribution of iron in the body and can thus provide additional support in the case of iron deficiency.

In contrast to the bad pathogens, lactoferrin promotes the growth of probiotic bacteria and thus supports a healthy intestinal flora with all its good bacteria. It thus maintains the intestinal flora while warding off harmful bacteria and viruses.

Where does lactoferrin occur?

Since lactoferrin is part of the innate immune system, it is found in various body fluids. The highest amount of lactoferrin is found in human colostrum. This is the initial milk that babies get from their mothers when breastfeeding after birth: with 8 mg per ml of lactoferrin, the colostrum supplies the little one and thus supports its immune system.

Lactoferrin is also found in tear fluid, saliva, vaginal secretions and seminal fluid. Of course, it is also found in the mucous membranes and directly in the white blood cells (immune cells) where it is associated with the immune system.

The innate immune system - how it works

The non-specific immune system, which is innate to us, forms in the womb and protects us from hour zero to a certain degree from invaders. It is the first line of defence of the immune system and an important protective barrier.
Various defence mechanisms ensure that initial contact with pathogens is ended as quickly as possible. Let's take a closer look at these:

The protection of the skin, with a surface area of approximately 2 m² , and the mucous membranes of, for example, the nose, mouth, throat, bronchi and gastrointestinal tract (the intestine has a surface area of an incredible 400 m² ), is also called the skin- and mucosa-associated immune system. While the skin is a mechanical protection of the body against invaders, the mucous membranes of the bronchial tubes transport the pathogens outside by sliming them in and removing them with the help of the cilia. If the mucus is swallowed, for example after coughing, the stomach acid does the rest.

Even if it does not appear so at first glance, the mucous membrane of the intestine actually has the most intensive contact with the outside world through food. This is how fungi, bacteria, viruses and other pathogens are smuggled into the body. The defence capacity of a healthy intestinal flora and intestinal mucosa can then eliminate these.

Another mechanism is phagocytosis: in this process, pathogens are eaten and digested by large phagocytes (macrophages) and small phagocytes (neutrophil granulocytes, i.e. a subtype of white blood cells). Macrophages and neutrophil granulocytes belong to the non-specific defence cells and are found in every tissue.
The dendritic cells of the immune system take up components of the previously phagocytised, i.e. digested pathogen and present these so-called antigens on their cell surface in order to trigger a specific immune response to them via the T and B lymphocytes.
The complement system - a system that can be activated during an immune reaction to the surfaces of microorganisms - is also part of the innate immune system. It has important things to do in the form of various successive reactions: One of these reaction steps is, for example, the perforation of bacteria, naturally with the aim of rendering them harmless. Other tasks are, for example, the marking of pathogens so that they are more quickly recognised as invaders or the triggering of inflammation to better eliminate pathogens.

Last but not least, there are the natural killer cells (NK). Their speciality is to recognise virus-infected cells as well as cancer cells and to destroy them by means of cell toxins.

What is important when choosing a lactoferrin product?

It can make sense to supplement with a high-quality lactoferrin product for a number of reasons. There are now many different products on the market, so a few pointers can help guide you through the lactoferrin jungle.

High degree of purity

Since lactoferrin is mostly extracted from cow's milk, it is very important that the extracted protein is thoroughly purified so that it no longer contains toxins or other unwanted interfering substances.

Gastro-resistant 

For lactoferrin to be fully effective, it is crucial that the protein is released in the intestine and does not fall victim to gastric juice. Therefore, enteric-coated capsules are a must for a good lactoferrin product.
Small hint: For this reason, lactoferrin capsules should also not be opened and dissolved in liquid!

Useful accompanying substances

Lactoferrin has many positive effects on the body, such as supporting a healthy immune system and normal iron metabolism. Therefore, other substances, such as a well-tolerated vitamin C, make great sense, which supports both in a complementary way.

Which lactoferrin product is available from TISSO?

Pro Lactoferrin Immune contains high-purity, premium-quality bovine lactoferrin, which is also combined with buffered, stomach-friendly vitamin C to support the immune system and iron balance.
The branded raw material Lactoferrin CLN™ has a uniquely high degree of purity of 98% thanks to patented two-stage purification and is therefore demonstrably more bioactive than conventional lactoferrin products.
Enteric-coated capsules (DRcaps®) ensure that the ingredients are only released in the intestine and are spared from gastric acid..

ohne Zusatzstoffe Glutenfrei Laktosefrei Fruktosefrei Frei von Schadstoffen Natürliche Inhaltsstoffe Hefefrei Hypoallergen Vegetarisch

Sources:
Wang, B., et al., Lactoferrin: Structure, function, denaturation and digestion. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 2019. 59(4): p. 580-596.
Berlutti, F., et al., Antiviral properties of lactoferrin--a natural immunity molecule. Molecules, 2011. 16(8): p. 6992-7018.
www.lactoferrin.de

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU.

Tisso Telefon+49 27 62 98 36 – 20 08

If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally. You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00 h.

Tisso WhatsApp +49 (0) 27 62 - 98 36 - 0

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Tisso Mail orders@tisso.de

You can email us at any time. We will reply within one working day.

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Minerals – The guide

Author: Theres Eisenreich ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 12. October 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 12. October 2021

 

Minerals

Important substances for our body

Important substances for our body

Health is the highest good! Even if this sentence seems a bit trite, it is more true than ever. Because our way of life has changed a lot in the last decades: Many factors, such as environmental influences, our modern diet with many foods that are unfortunately poorer and poorer in nutrients due to the demineralisation of the soil, and an increased stress level, are challenges for our body. And when we lack well-being, everything becomes burdensome. In order to give our body the chance to remain healthy and efficient for a long time, it needs, among other things, various vital substances to be able to optimally supply all its organ systems. And minerals are a significant part of this.

What are minerals?
Minerals – function and effect
The daily requirement of minerals
Mineral products – this is important
Mineral product from TISSO

What are minerals?What are minerals?

Minerals are valuable substances without which our body would not function. They ensure that everything in the organism works as it should and that metabolic processes are not disturbed. But where exactly do they occur in the body? In short: everywhere. Calcium, for example, is responsible for the strength of bones, among other things. It is absorbed from food in the intestine, transported to the bones in the blood and built into the bones with the help of vitamin D, among other things.

Minerals and trace elements - what is the difference?

In the world of healthy nutrition, there are a few terms floating around that you may have heard before but still can't quite place. Therefore, we will now shed some light on the dark universe of substances. In order to provide the body with everything it needs, it can be an advantage to know a little about these substances. Basically, the terms themselves make it clear: the body needs a trace element in traces, i.e. less than 50 mg/kg body weight. Several minerals, on the other hand, are needed by the organism in larger quantities, i.e. more than 50 mg/kg body weight.

Minerals include well-known ones such as magnesium and calcium, but also zinc, selenium and copper. Since the body cannot produce minerals itself, but they are essential for life, they must be obtained from food. This usually works quite well, provided you eat a varied diet with good food, preferably organic, which still contains the most nutrients, and you do not have an increased need.

Minerals - function and effectMinerals - function and effect

If you take a look at the following diagram and the function of the minerals in the body, you will immediately notice that they really do many essential tasks in the body and that they always work hand in hand. Never is only one substance responsible for one function in the organism. In teamwork, all these substances - which together with vitamins and others are called micronutrients - are necessary for certain metabolic processes or have a cofactor function so that everything runs smoothly in the body.

Mineralstoffe sind wertvoll für den Körper  Energiestoffwechsel  Calcium Magnesium Phosphor Eisen Jod Kupfer Mangan Fruchtbarkeit und Reproduktion     Selen Zink Haut, Haare und Nägel  Jod Kupfer Selen Zink Immunsystem     Eisen Kupfer Selen Zink Knochen  Calcium Magnesium Phosphor Mangan Zink Kognitive Funktionen   Jod Zink Eisen Muskelfunktion  Calcium Kalium Magnesium Verringerung von Müdigkeit und Ermüdung     Magnesium Eisen Nervensystem    Kalium Magnesium Jod Kupfer Schilddrüse  Jod Selen Schutz vor oxidativem Stress  Kupfer Mangan Selen Zink Stoffwechsel   Chrom Molybdän Zink Testosteronspiegel     Zink Zellteilung und -spezialisierung  Calcium Magnesium Eisen Zink Zähne  Calcium Magnesium Phosphor

The daily requirement of mineralsThe daily requirement of minerals

We have now learned that the intake of minerals is important throughout life. Now the question remains: Who needs how much of what? The daily requirement of minerals and trace elements can depend significantly on a person's age, sex and life situation.

Calcium
1,000 - 1,200 mg
Potassium
2,000 mg
Magnesium
300 - 400 mg
Sodium
1,500 mg
Phosphorus
1,250 mg (adolescents),
700 mg (adults)
Chrome
30 - 100 µg
Iron
12 - 15 mg (adolescents),
10 mg (men),
15 mg (women)
Iodine
200 µg
Copper
1 - 1,5 mg
Manganese
2 - 5 mg
Molybdenum
50 - 100 µg
Selenium
30 - 70 µg
Zinc
7 - 10 mg

Mineral-rich foods: These belong on the plate

Burgers, fries and the like are popular fast food to satisfy hunger and appetite. As so-called soul food, this is also allowed once in a while. However, it should be clear at this point that these types of meals provide rather few minerals. To cover our daily need for minerals, nature provides us with wonderful alternative sources that we can help ourselves to daily and enrich our diet. First and foremost, this includes all kinds of vegetables, fruit and whole grains. But nuts, seeds, sprouts, good meat and fish are also great foods with a high mineral content.

Calcium
Hard cheese (low-fat), Emmental (45% fat in dry matter), Kale (fresh, cooked), Yoghurt (full-fat)
Potassium
Apricots (dried), white beans, spinach leaves (cooked), bananas
Magnesium
Pumpkin seeds, cashew nuts, almonds, dark chocolate
Sodium
Gouda (45% F in dry matter), French fries, tomato paste, olives (marinated)
Phosphorus
Emmental (45% fat in dry matter), white beans, millet, salmon
Chrome
Brazil nuts, Gouda (45% in dry matter), corn, honey, white beans
Iron
Pork liver, cocoa powder (low oil), millet, lentils
Iodine
Haddock, cod, prawns (fresh), redfish, iodised table salt
Copper
Cashews, prawns, lentils, artichokes
Manganese
Hazelnuts (roasted), kale, blueberries, white beans
Molybdenum
Buckwheat, red cabbage, cocoa powder, pike-perch
Selenium
Pork kidneys, Brazil nuts, beef fillet, brown rice
Zinc
Oysters, Emmental (45% F. in dry matter), Brazil nuts, lentils

Mineral deficiency - This is how it can happen

There are some life situations in which it is not only difficult to cover the daily need for minerals with food, but the need for these vital substances actually increases. Now it can quickly happen that a deficiency creeps in that is not even noticed at first.

The following factors, living conditions and diets, among others, cause an increased need for minerals:

Lifestyle/general factors

Donating blood: iron
Menopausal women: calcium
Young women: calcium
Menstruation: iron
Oral contraceptives: magnesium
Oxidative stress: manganese, selenium, zinc
Smoking: calcium, selenium
Senior age: chromium, zinc Selenium, zinc or iron deficiency: iodine
Stress: magnesium
Burns: phosphorus
Vitamin D deficiency: phosphorus, calcium
Growth/childhood: iron, iodine, copper, zinc

Diet

One-sided diets: zinc
High-fat diet: chromium
High consumption of coffee and tea: iodine, iron, potassium, magnesium
High consumption of simple carbohydrates (alcohol, white flour products): manganese, molybdenum, chromium
Low potassium diet (few fruits and vegetables): potassium
Dairy products: iron
High-salt food: potassium
Vegan/vegetarian diet: iodine, zinc, selenium

Sports
Calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium (endurance sports), iodine, potassium (heavy sweating), copper, phosphorus, selenium (bodybuilders, competitive athletes), zinc.
Diseases

The diseases listed are about a possibly increased need for the mineral and not about alleviation, cure or prevention of the disease.

Acne: zinc
Acute/chronic infections: zinc
Alcoholism: calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, copper, magnesium, selenium, zinc
Allergies: zinc
Osteoarthritis: manganese
Diabetes mellitus: chromium, potassium, copper, magnesium, manganese
Diarrhoea: potassium, magnesium
Cancer: magnesium, selenium
Anorexia: calcium
Cystic fibrosis: calcium, copper
Kidney diseases: magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, calcium
Rheumatism: selenium

Avoid overdosing on calcium - a good ratio to magnesium is important

In fact, some minerals may even be present in the body in excessive amounts. Although the body gets rid of some excess minerals through the urine, others are stored or shifted by it. Calcium and magnesium, for example, should not only be present in the body in a good required amount, but also in an optimal ratio to each other. The dream team for the support of normal energy metabolism and the maintenance of healthy bones and teeth needs each other to benefit the body.

The perfect ratio of calcium to magnesium has now been redefined by modern studies: instead of 2:1, the equivalent ratio of 1:1 is now considered sensible - just as our Stone Age ancestors did with their original and natural Stone Age or Paleo diet without calcium-rich dairy products. In our diet today, the calcium content is much higher than the magnesium content. The often advertised 2:1 ratio of the two mineral elements was originally only a minimum recommendation for the magnesium content.

Was ist für die Auswahl eines Mineralstoff-Produktes wichtig? Mineral products - this is important

Everything important should be included
A good product is characterised by the right combination and a sensible ratio of all essential minerals and trace elements. The trace elements iron and iodine, however, are better substituted individually.

Sensible proportions of calcium and magnesium
The two mineral elements calcium and magnesium should be present in food supplements in a ratio of 1:1 instead of 2:1, since calcium is usually more than adequately absorbed with food.

Ensure good bioavailability
If the minerals are well combined from several sources in the product, the body can absorb and utilise them optimally.

das hilft beim verdauen Which mineral product is
available from TISSO?

Contains all important minerals
Pro Mineral Complete supplies all important minerals in perfect doses for increased mineral requirements. With its range of 17 excellently bioavailable compounds, it ensures optimal absorption in the body. The formulation is rounded off with a multi-mineral complex from Lithothamnium red algae, which is sustainably harvested off the Westfjords of Iceland. The seaweed provides calcium, magnesium and an additional 72 trace elements.

Pro Mineral Complete

ohne Zusatzstoffe Glutenfrei Laktosefrei Fruktosefrei Frei von Schadstoffen
Natürliche Inhaltsstoffe Hefefrei Hypoallergen Vegan

Why neither iron nor iodine is added

Iron as well as iodine are very need-dependent. For example, additional iron is more useful for women of menstruating age. It is therefore better to substitute these two trace elements separately and according to need. Pro Mineral Complete can thus be taken as a beneficial complex by all people with an increased need for minerals.

Calcium to magnesium in an optimal ratio

Calcium and magnesium are present in a 1:1 ratio and thus correspond to the original Stone Age diet. One daily dose also completely covers the magnesium requirement.

Optimal bioavailability
Important minerals are available from several sources in Pro Mineral Complete: It contains three forms of magnesium and two forms each of calcium, potassium, zinc and manganese. The targeted combination of inorganic salts with selected organic amino and fruit acid chelates enables the minerals to be absorbed and utilised particularly well in the body.

For better tolerance, the common citrate compounds were deliberately omitted, as they can have a laxative effect on sensitive people even in small quantities.

Natural carbonates from the Lithothamnium red algae

All carbonate compounds in Pro Mineral Complete come from the red algae Lithothamnium calcareum. Thanks to their natural, porous surface structure, the algae carbonates dissolve better in hydrochloric acid than isolated carbonate compounds. Thus, more carbonates arrive in the body with the same amount of stomach acid.

Sources

https://flexikon.doccheck.com/de

https://www.lebensmittelverband.de/de/lebensmittel/inhaltsstoffe/mineralstoffe

http://www.vitalstoff-lexikon.de/index.php

Gröber, U. Mikronährstoffe: Metabolic Tuning-Prävention-Therapie; 3. Auflage (Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH Stuttgart, 2011).

Gröber, U. Mikronährstoffe: Beratungsempfehlungen für die Praxis. (Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH Stuttgart, 2006).

Böhm, U. & Muss, C.Rationelle Therapie in der Mikronährstoffmedizin. (UNI-MED-Verlag, 2011).

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Immunsystem


Author: Leonie Kraus ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 14. October 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 14. October 2021‎‎‏‏‎‎‎‏‏‎

Immune system

Our immune system performs vital tasks every day: It protects our body from invaders such as bacteria, viruses or fungi. When it is working properly, we hardly notice its work.

However, if the invaders cannot be successfully warded off by the natural defence reactions of a healthy immune system, which can be shown, for example, by feeling listless for a short time, fever, cold and cough, we become susceptible to infections and it takes a very long time until we are fit again. However, the disease could also take a chronic course.

How our immune system is built, how it is linked to our intestine and which micronutrients our immune system really needs, you will learn in this blog post.

Immune system

Structure and function

The task of the immune system is to recognise and ward off foreign substances and invaders. No matter whether it is a bacterial infection, a highly infectious virus or spoiled food: A strong, active immune system can protect us from all these stresses and is thus responsible for our health and for a high quality of life and optimal performance.

The immune system can be activated by so-called antigens - substances foreign to the body. These include proteins found on the surface of bacteria, fungi and viruses. When these antigens dock onto special receptors of immune cells, a series of cellular processes are set in motion. After the first contact with a pathogen, the corresponding information is usually stored. Upon renewed contact, the information can be retrieved immediately and the body can fight off the pathogen more quickly.

The body's cells also have such surface proteins. However, the immune system can normally distinguish between them and does not usually act on them. If it wrongly classifies the body's cells as foreign bodies, this is called an autoimmune reaction. This defence then fights against the body's own and healthy cells.

Where is the immune system located and what does the intestine have to do with our immune defence?

Unlike the heart, lungs or liver, the immune system is not a closed organ. Rather, it is an interplay of different components in the body. These include the skin and mucous membranes as well as the spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes. The latter in particular quickly become noticeable as swelling.

However, the most important organ of the body's immune defence is the intestine. Up to 80% of our immune cells are located there. The intestinal flora also plays an important role when it comes to our immune protection.

There are many factors that can influence our immune system and especially our intestine. Nutrition plays a very large role in this. Because various nutrients, vitamins or trace elements take on different tasks in our body and contribute to a healthy immune system, for example. These include vitamin C, which is particularly abundant in sea buckthorn berries, peppers, black currants and parsley, and zinc, which is particularly found in beef, eggs, pecans and rye sprouts. Soluble dietary fibres also support the intestinal environment and digestion as "food" for the good intestinal bacteria. In this way, we can specifically adapt our diet and positively influence the immune system via our intestines.

Since a healthy intestine contributes significantly to an intact immune system, a dysfunctional intestine can also weaken the body's own defences. For example, the intestine reacts very sensitively to psychological stress. To enable this short-term increase in our performance, energy is extracted from the gastrointestinal tract and used where it is needed. As a result, normal intestinal activities are reduced and the movement of the intestine slows down. The intestinal cells also provide less oxygen and nutrients, which can also affect the function of the immune system.

Conversely, a weak immune system can also cause intestinal problems. This means that when our immune system is weakened, pathogens can multiply more quickly in the intestine, which leads to a deterioration of our intestinal environment, making it easier for us to fall ill.

4 tips on how to strengthen
our immune system:

Add variety to your plate, especially with seasonal foods. Things that do not require long-term storage and transport are more nutritious.

Exercise is especially important for a healthy immune system. Preferably several times a week and in the fresh air.

Sufficient sleep is also important for a healthy immune system. On average, six to eight hours are ideal. However, this is individual for everyone. With healthy sleep, cells and processes in our body have time to recover. Those who have a lot of stress can also balance it out with yoga or autogenic training.

A healthy lifestyle means keeping things away from your body that are not good for it. Nicotine, for example, reduces the number of our antibodies, which contributes to a weakening of the body's own defences. Also, under the influence of alcohol, the immune cells become slower and cannot react as quickly to invaders. Therefore, nicotine and alcohol should be avoided as much as possible.

What weakens our immune system?

A weak immune system can have various causes, for example underlying diseases, but an unhealthy lifestyle also impairs its performance. Other factors that can weaken our immune system are:
• Lack of sleep
• Nutrient-poor diet
• Stress
• Lack of exercise
• Frequent consumption of alcohol and nicotine
• Certain medicines

Which micronutrients does my immune system need?

In addition to the tips mentioned above, you can also strengthen your immune system by taking in micronutrients.
A sufficient supply of all important vitamins, trace elements and minerals is always important for a healthy life. Here we have summarised what is particularly important for our immune system:

Vitamin C
contributes to a normal function of the immune system and helps to protect the cells from oxidative stress. This is particularly important in the cold season. It also supports a normal energy metabolism and helps to reduce tiredness and fatigue.

Vitamin D
is important for the immune system and the body needs vitamin D all year round. Especially in autumn and winter, it is important to ensure a sufficient supply, because vitamin D plays an important role for a healthy immune system.

Zinc
not only contributes to the normal functioning of our immune system, but also acts as an antioxidant to protect the body from oxidative stress. The body cannot produce zinc itself, which is why a regular supply from outside is particularly important.

Selenium
promotes not only a healthy function of the immune system but also the protection of the cells against oxidative stress as well as a healthy function of our thyroid gland.

B-Vitamins
support a strong immune system all around: they are important for a healthy energy metabolism - the immune system needs a lot of energy - and can help reduce tiredness and fatigue. In addition, vitamin B2 protects the body from oxidative stress, which can weaken the immune system.

Vitamin A
contributes to the maintenance of healthy skin and mucous membranes. This is important because our defence system consists of skin and mucous membranes as well as immune cells.

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bitter substances

Author: Alexandra Vorsmann ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published: 20. June 2020‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated: 26. April 2021

 

Bitter substances

 

Nice and bitter for the stomach

Rich meals, sweet cookies and chocolate in between, and a couple of glasses of alcohol can sometimes be hard on the stomach. However, there are a few helpful (bitter) herbs to counteract feelings of fullness, heartburn and the like.

For most of us, bitter flavours are not popular. We have almost completely banished them from our menu. They have nowadays even been largely cultivated out of originally bitter-tasting vegetables such as chicory, endive, artichokes or savoy cabbage. However, bitter substances, consumed in moderation, can do a lot of good. Since prehistoric times, they have been used above all due to their digestion-stimulating effect. Yet their influence goes even much deeper ...

Nice and bitter for the stomach

The bitter taste
Bitter substances - Effect
Bitter foods
Help for digestion

 

The bitter taste The bitter taste

Bitter doesn’t have to be bad

Our aversion to bitter substances is not without reason. This is because some bitter substances, such as solanine in raw potatoes or cucurbitacin in ornamental pumpkins, are in fact toxic. Our ancestors, who did not find their food neatly sorted and quality-controlled in the supermarket, had an intuition for such toxic foods – this often saved their lives.

The human tongue identifies only a few basic flavour categories: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami (umami = meaty-savoury, triggered by glutamic acid).

This rough classification primarily has one purpose: to immediately detect whether an unknown substance in the mouth is nourishing or hazardous. Sour and bitter signal unripe, fermented or poisonous food; by contrast, salty, sweet and umami signal vital minerals, calories and proteins.

It is not so much the mouth but instead the nose in particular that decides whether we think a food “tastes good”. Its olfactory cells perceive the complex aromas which reach the nasal cavities via the throat.

Bitterness can be (re-)learned

In general, radicchio and artichokes are not exactly among children’s favourite foods. Children strongly reject bitter vegetables in most cases. This is no surprise: Their palate is still far more sensitive than that of adults. For a long time, it was believed that this was because the number and density of taste buds decreases with age. Babies are born with around 10,000 taste buds but only about 2000 remain in old age. However, studies have not confirmed such a connection. It is now assumed that the functionality of taste receptors decreases.

The fact that adults (can) learn to appreciate bitter flavours in the course of life is not due in any case to decreased taste perception. The main reason is simply habituation. The more often we consume bitter foods, the more the body becomes accustomed to the bitter substances. Cultural and social influences play an important role here. For example, adolescents only develop a taste for the bitter “adult beverages” coffee and beer gradually.

Only one thing helps to get a child to accept a rejected vegetable: begin as early as possible and do not give up immediately after the second or third disappointing attempt. According to a British study, it takes five to ten attempts until a majority of children accept a food they initially did not like.

25 receptor types for the bitter taste
Thousands of taste buds in the oral cavity and, in particular, on the tongue are responsible for taste perception – also known as gustatory perception. They contain special receptor cells which transmit taste stimuli to the brain. While we have only one receptor type each for sweet and sour, humans are known to have 25 different bitter receptors.

Yet not everything poisonous tastes bitter and not everything that tastes bitter is poisonous. Even animals, when they have stomach problems, specifically eat bitter-tasting medicinal plants. And in Italian cuisine, which is considered to be healthy in any case, fine bitter flavours, such as from radicchio and artichokes, have a long tradition.

 

Bitter substances ‒ Effect Bitter substances ‒ Effect

Bitter substances promote digestion
Why should we, however, get (re-)accustomed to the bitter taste? For centuries,bitter substances have played an integral role in Ayurvedic, Chinese and traditional European medicine. As the folk saying even goes: “Good medicine must taste bitter, otherwise it’s of no use”. This certainly does not apply to every medicine, yet an important part of the effect of bitter substances is based on their bitter taste. Some scientists support the theory that the body stimulates digestion in order to rid itself quickly of the bitter presumed toxin. erden.

Food is utilised faster and better
The taste of bitterness literally makes one’s mouth water immediately. The bitter stimuli on the tongue reflexively stimulate the production of digestive juices in the mouth and stomach. Upon contact with the gastric mucosa, digestion hormones are additionally excreted which prod the intestines into action: The mucosa contracts and expands once again, metabolic waste and harmful substances are carried away more easily. The digestive secretions released also include bile, which is particularly important for the digestion of fat. Thus food is utilised more thoroughly and faster overall.

Bitter receptors are a part of the immune system
Surprisingly, taste cells are not found only in the mouth and throat. Bitter receptors have now also been identified in the nose and paranasal sinuses, in the intestine and bladder, in the lungs and bronchi, and even in the heart. Which tasks they specifically have there have only been partially decoded.
It is clear that bitter receptors react not only to substances in food but also to “bitter-tasting” bacterial signalling substances. American researchers discovered that people who react particularly strongly to bitter substances (referred to as super tasters) suffer less often from infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. These also include, for example, the notorious pseudomonads which are frequently resistant to antibiotics.
Upon contact with the bacterial signalling substances, the bitter receptors trigger defence mechanisms: They activate cilia in the respiratory tract so that microbes can be coughed out and they additionally stimulate the release of substances that have an antibacterial effect.
The bitter receptors in the body thus influence not only metabolism but they are also an active part of the immune system.

Bitter substances – Weight loss
Whether bitter substances can also help with weight loss is disputed. Theoretically, the satiation effect occurs earlier due to the accelerated digestion and one automatically eats less as a result. Yet bitter substances alone are hardly likely to lead to sustainable weight loss. However, they may at least help quell disastrous cravings for sweet foods.

 

bittere lebensmittelBitter foods

 

Which foods contain a lot of bitter substances?
If you would like to refine your menu more often with a few bitter notes, there are lots of options available to you. The following table shows you which foods contain a large amount of bitter compounds:

Vegetables
Chicory, arugula, chard, radicchio, artichokes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, endive
Fruit
Orange, grapefruit, pomelo
Herbs & spices
Marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, thyme, cloves, juniper, ginger, lemon balm, mugwort, fenugreek, galangal, chervil, turmeric, wormwood
Wild herbs
Dandelion, sorrel, nettle, daisy, goutweed, garlic mustard, hops, chicory, ground ivy, chickweed
Non-nutritional foods
Coffee, black and green tea, beer, red wine, cocoa, dark chocolate

Gentian drops
Bitter substances are not a uniform group of substances and they may have a very different chemical make-up. They are defined simply by the fact that they taste bitter. Like essential oils, flavonoids or tannins, they are considered to be secondary plant substances. Plants form them to protect against being eaten by animals.

The most bitter natural substance in the world is considered to be amarogentin from the yellow gentian root. The bitter substance can be tasted even in a dilution of 1 to 58 million – a concentration formed by diluting a shot glass of amarogentin with the amount of water from 5800 bathtubs. It’s no coincidence that gentian is a popular ingredient in aperitifs and digestive bitters.

Incidentally, organic foods contain a lot of bitter substances in particular. The reason is obvious: since no pesticides are allowed during cultivation, plants must defend themselves against animals that want to eat them and form increased amounts of bitter substances.

Bitterstoffe Tropfen

 

Help for digestion Help for digestion

 

At celebrations in particular, most of us eat too much and too quickly and consume foods which are too high in fat.
But don’t worry – any healthy person who goes overboard for a short period of time does not risk any long-term digestive problems.
ere are a few tips for improving digestion of festive feasts in the short term:

  • Add a few bitter foods to the menu. For example, how about a chicory, arugula or endive salad? As an aperitif before a meal, a stimulating herbal bitter can also kick start digestion. By contrast, the popular “digestifs” after the meal briefly relax the stomach muscles, but hard liquor puts additional strain on the liver and stomach.
  • Give yourself some time – in particular also when eating. Putting too much strain on your stomach quickly causes its muscles to weaken. Take breaks or simply leave a course out of a multicourse meal. And pay attention to your feelings of satiety: it takes the body 15 to 20 minutes to signal that it is full.
  • “After eating, you should take a rest...”
    That depends: anyone who tends to get heartburn is better off not lying down directly after eating. The gastric juices produced during digestion can flow more easily into the oesophagus when lying down.
  • “... or take 1000 steps”.
    Taking a walk after eating is a good idea in principle. The circulatory system gets a boost, intestinal movements and circulation of the gastrointestinal tract are stimulated. However, after heavy meals, it is preferable to first sit down for a while and rest because the body now requires a lot of energy for digestion. High-performance athletics are not recommended.

 

Bitter substance drops

 

Natural bitter substances: Pro Intest

If you would prefer a cautious approach, you can also try out natural bitter substance drops – for example our herbal bitter Pro Intest from TISSO with a balanced ratio of traditionally valuable herbs: wormwood, black walnut, gentian, papaya leaves, olive leaves, cloves, ginger, juniper, quassia wood, dandelion, hyssop, red clover and thyme.

A balanced ratio of traditionally valuable herbs and high-quality alcohol give Pro Intest its flavourful characteristics.

fruktosefrei hefefrei ohne Zusatzstoffe vegan schadstofffrei natürlich laktosefrei hypoallergen glutenfrei

 

See what’s in it: Simply use the cursor to hover over the picture.
Alcohol content 32% vol.
Incl. VAT, plus shipping costs
See online shop for subscription delivery
100 ml

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If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally.
You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00.

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Proteine

 


Author: Leonie Kraus ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 5. June 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 5. June 2021‎‎‏‏‎

 

Proteins

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The vital proteins consist of amino acids and are among the basic building blocks of human cells.
Our body composes proteins from 20 different amino acids.
These are divided into three different categories:

Proteins

Essential amino acids:
Eight amino acids cannot be produced by the body itself, which means they have to be supplied through food.

Semi-essential amino acids:
The body can produce at least four amino acids itself, but in some situations not in sufficient quantities. This is the case, for example, with increased protein requirements - such as during growth, pregnancy, sport or for elderly persons.

Non-essential amino acids:
Twelve non-essential amino acids can be produced by the body itself.

Essential amino acids
Isoleucin, lucin, lysin, methionin, phenylalanin, threonin, tryptophan, valin
Semi-essential amino acids
Arginine, histidine, cysteine, tyrosine
Non-essential amino acids
Alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, histidine, proline, serine, tyrosine

What functions do proteins perform in the body?

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Proteins support, for example:

• the maintenance of muscle mass
• an increase in muscle mass
• the maintenance of normal bones

Proteins can be categorised into:

Structural proteins are mainly found in connective tissue, bones and cartilage as well as muscles, which are very important for maintaining the body structure.

Immune proteins, for example, are the antibodies of our immune system, which is responsible for fighting pathogens.

Transport proteins are divided into two categories: Transmembrane proteins and plasma proteins. Transmembrane proteins are found in biomembranes through which substances can be transported. Plasma proteins are found in the blood, where substances such as lipids, hormones and oxygen are transported and blood clotting is regulated.

Motor proteins, such as actin and myosin, are found in muscle, which must always be ready for muscle contractions.

Which foods are particularly rich in protein?

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Protein intake should be regulated as much as possible through food. There are many foods that can be used as high-quality sources of protein. These include the following foods:

Pulses are tasty and versatile sources of protein and contain about a quarter of high-quality protein. At the top of the list are lentils (26 g per 100 g), peas (23 g per 100 g) and chickpeas (20 g per 100 g). They are a high-quality source of protein, especially for vegetarians and vegans. They taste good as a soup, as a hummus preparation or even in a salad.

They have been among the superfoods for centuries, and not without reason. Hemp seeds contain many valuable substances and proteins (37 g per 100 g). They go well with pasta, protein shakes and porridge.

Lean beef (fillet, rump steak, topside) provides 26 g of protein per 100 g of meat. A valuable supporter for muscles and bones.

The protein content of peanuts is 26 g per 100 g. In direct comparison, this is higher than the protein content of almonds, cashews and walnuts. Even though peanuts consist of about 50 percent fat, they are very healthy because the proportion of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids is very high.

Fish also have a high protein content. For example, 100 g of mackerel contain 24 g of protein or 100 g of tuna 22 g of protein. Seafood such as scampi, prawns or mussels are also good sources of protein. In addition, fish contain a lot of the good omega-3 fatty acids that support healthy brain function, heart function and eyesight.

Animal or vegetable protein - which is better?

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Basically, animal and plant products contain the same amino acids. They only differ in their composition and quantity. They are all broken down in the stomach and intestines and enter the bloodstream in the same way.

Proteins from animal sources usually have a high content of essential amino acids. They are therefore similar to the proteins in the human body. In addition, the human body can utilise animal protein more easily and convert it into the body's own proteins. Overall, this means that animal proteins have a particularly high value.

Vegetable protein is nevertheless considered healthier, as animal sources often contain more saturated fats and produce much more uric acid in the body. Vegetable protein sources are also rich in valuable substances such as vitamins, secondary plant substances and dietary fibre.

Does it make sense to supplement protein?

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The intake of proteins through food is basically sufficient in a balanced diet. However, this requires that we look at our food to guarantee a sufficient intake of proteins.

In addition to diet, there is also the possibility of supporting our body in protein supply with a nutritional supplement. This can be particularly useful when there is an increased need for protein. If you decide to take a nutritional supplement, you should pay attention to a few things when buying it.

What should be considered when choosing a protein powder?

tisso naturprodukte

Less additives
The ingredient lists of protein products are often very long. The shorter the list of ingredients used, the more unprocessed the protein powder usually is. Sweeteners, flavours, emulsifiers or thickeners should not appear among the ingredients.

Manufactured in Germany
It is particularly important to pay attention to good quality and transparent origin of the raw materials. The manufacturing and production processes on German soil are subject to the strictest guidelines according to DIN ISO standards and the HACCP concept. Among other things, these lay down hygiene regulations and a strict quality management system for production facilities.

High protein content
Protein products should contain as much protein as possible. As a guideline, a protein content of 75 grams per 100 grams of powder can be determined. The protein content is indicated in the nutritional information of the product.

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Tisso Telefon+49 27 62 98 36 – 20 08

If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally.
You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00.

Tisso WhatsApp +49 (0) 27 62 - 98 36 - 0

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Saturated And Unsaturated Fatty Acids


Author: Leonie Kraus ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 6. June 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 6. June 2021‎‎‏‏‎

Saturated And Unsaturated Fatty Acids

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What is actually the difference between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids?

Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

Basically, there are different ways to classify fats. The most common subdivision is into fats with saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, fats can also be subdivided according to the chain length of the fatty acids, i.e. short-chain, medium-chain or long-chain, or according to their origin, i.e. vegetable or animal fat. In the following, we will take a closer look at saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

Monounsaturated fatty acids

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Monounsaturated fatty acids can be produced by our body itself and are also found in vegetable oils and certain nuts.

Replacing saturated fatty acids with monounsaturated as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet helps to maintain normal cholesterol levels if the foods have a high content of these fatty acids.

The best suppliers include:
• Olive oil
• Roasted pecan nuts
• Almonds
• Cashew puree

Polyunsaturated fatty acids

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Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential for the human body. These include above all omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Since the body cannot produce these fatty acids itself, they must be obtained from food. However, our body needs a balanced ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. The optimal ratio is 1:1 to a maximum of 5:1.

In the past, our food itself ensured a balance between the two fatty acids. However, our changing dietary habits have greatly altered the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio. Today, we usually consume about 15 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. This is the result of a diet in which fish is less and less on the menu. Instead, fast food and convenience food as well as sweet and salty snacks are becoming more and more popular.

Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids are especially fatty fish such as cod, herring, mackerel, salmon or sardines as well as algae. Since fish enrich their omega-3 content through algae, the type of food they eat is crucial. Wild-caught fish, for example, contain a high amount of omega-3 fatty acids due to their rich consumption of algae, shrimps and small crustaceans.

Vegetable oils such as linseed oil, chia oil and walnut oil contain a particularly high amount of omega-3 fatty acids. However, these vegetarian sources mainly contain the omega-3 fatty acid ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). The valuable polyunsaturated fatty acids DHA and EPA can be formed from this in our body. However, how much ALA the body converts into EPA and DHA is very individual. On average, it is only 5 to about 15 percent.

The omega-3 fatty acids DHA and RPA have the following effect on our body

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Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential for the human body. These include above all omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Since the body cannot produce these fatty acids itself, they must be obtained from food. However, our body needs a balanced ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. The optimal ratio is 1:1 to a maximum of 5:1.

For a healthy brain function
DHA contributes to the maintenance of normal
brain function and normal vision with a daily intake of 250 mg.

For a healthy heart function
EPA and DHA contribute to normal heart
function at a daily intake of 250 mg.

For the development of the infant's brain & eyes
The daily intake of 200 mg of DHA by the mother in
addition to the recommended daily intake for adults
contributes to normal brain and eye development in
the foetus and the breastfed infant.

For normal vision
A daily intake of at least 250 mg DHA contributes
to the maintenance of normal vision.

Saturated fatty acids

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Saturated fatty acids are predominantly found in animal foods such as fatty meat, sausage and whole milk products as well as in crisps and baked goods. They can have an unfavourable effect on our cholesterol balance, as they lower the amount of the good transport molecule HDL and increase that of the bad lipoprotein LDL.

Due to today's diet, most people consume far too many saturated fatty acids.

We should therefore make sure that the total calorie amount of saturated fatty acids is less than 10 percent of the daily requirement.

Coconut oil is a special case. Although it belongs to the group of saturated fatty acids, it contains the healthy medium-chain fatty acids. These are converted directly into energy and make you feel fuller for longer. Coconut oil is excellent for frying, as it is heat-stable up to 200 degrees.

Conclusion

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So we can say that certain fats are definitely healthy and needed by the body. Healthy fats - i.e. unsaturated fatty acids - contribute to maintaining normal cholesterol levels in the blood. But saturated fatty acids also have their place. This is because saturated oils are better for frying than unsaturated ones, as no trans fats can form. With animal fats, you should definitely pay attention to the animal husbandry, because organic meat products - due to the feeding - contain higher amounts of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced food. The amount of omega-3 fatty acids in fish also varies depending on the catch area and season. Therefore, you should pay attention to the origin when buying fish.

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Nutrients for women


Author: Leonie Kraus ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 12. May 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 1st December 2021‎‎‏‏‎

Nutrients for women

In a balanced diet, it is not only important to cover the need for macronutrients - such as carbohydrates, fats and proteins - but also the need for essential micronutrients - such as vitamins and minerals. The need depends on age, lifestyle and, above all, gender. Although women have a lower energy requirement than men, the need for micronutrients is usually just as high or sometimes even higher.

Therefore, it is especially important for women to lead a balanced and healthy lifestyle so that their nutrient needs are met even with a lower energy intake.

But not only the lower energy requirement, but also other factors can increase one's own nutrient requirements. These include, for example:

Puberty:
At this time, the female body changes extremely. Sexual maturity begins and the body prepares for pregnancy every month. Due to the period and often also psychological changes, there is an increased need for nutrients.

Birth control pill:
It interferes with the nutrient balance and deprives the body of important vitamins, minerals and trace elements.

Stress:
Doing justice to both work and family often creates stress. This leads to increased cortisol levels, which robs our body of some nutrients.

Diets:
Permanent calorie restriction often leads to a nutrient deficiency. If low-fat products are also consumed, the body does not get enough essential omega-3 fatty acids.

Intense training:
Sport and exercise are of course essential for our bodies. However, in moderation. Sporting training increases the need for essential nutrients. One should always pay attention to sufficient regeneration and sleep.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding:
Due to the creation of a new life, the female body has an increased micronutrient requirement during pregnancy and also during breastfeeding. During this time, nutrients are needed for two people.

Menopause:
During the menopause, the female body again undergoes extreme changes. The beginning is usually a lack of progesterone and expands with a lack of oestrogen.
The production of male hormones fails and ultimately leads to the woman becoming infertile. This completely upsets the hormonal balance - which manifests itself in hot flushes, sleep disorders and dizzy spells.

Now, of course, the question is which nutrients are particularly important for the female body and which women should pay special attention to. Basically, all micronutrients are vital for us, but there are some nutrients that have a special significance in the female body. These include:

For a healthy immune system 
Vitamin C and D, folate as well as zinc are important for a healthy function of the immune system.

For normal collagen production
Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen production.

For cell division 
Folate has a function in cell division.

For normal reproduction 
Zinc contributes to normal fertility and reproduction. Zinc contributes to the maintenance of normal bones, skin, hair and nails.

For the maintenance of the bones 
Calcium is needed for the maintenance of normal bones and vitamin D contributes to normal blood calcium levels.

For normal function of the nervous system
Magnesium contributes to normal functioning of the nervous system and to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue.

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Tisso Telefon+49 27 62 98 36 – 20 08

If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally.
You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00 h.

Tisso WhatsApp +49 (0) 27 62 - 98 36 - 0

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Tisso Mail orders@tisso.de

You can email us at any time. We will reply within one working day.

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Omega-3 fatty acids

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Vitamin D3, K2 & A

Vitamin D3, K2 & A

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Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12

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Vitamin C


Author: Leonie Kraus ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published on: 11. May 2021‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Updated on: 11. May 2021‎‎‏‏‎

Vitamin C

Vitamin C – Guide

Vitamin C - also known as ascorbic acid - is one of the water-soluble vitamins, along with the B vitamins and folic acid. Unlike the fat-soluble vitamins, they can only be stored in the body to a very limited extent. This means they must be obtained regularly through food. For a short time, vitamin C is stored in the human body in organs and tissues such as the adrenal gland, pituitary gland, lens of the eye, spleen and brain.

Effect of vitamin C

Vitamin C Lebensmittel

Vitamin C is essential for life and regulates various metabolic processes in our body. For example, it contributes to the formation of collagen in our body and is thus involved in building connective tissue, bones, cartilage function, teeth and gums, and helps in the formation of messenger substances and hormones. It also contributes to healthy functioning of the energy metabolism, nervous system and mental function and can help protect cells from oxidative stress. This means it protects the cells in our body from free radicals. An increased concentration of free radicals results, for example, from an unbalanced diet, lack of exercise, environmental toxins, medication and physical stress. Vitamin C also supports the absorption of iron during digestion.

Food containing vitamin C

The vitamin C requirement can be covered with a balanced and healthy diet. The following foods should be regularly included in the diet:

Vitamin C Acerola Kirsche
Vitamin C Petersilie
Vitamin C Hagebutten
Vitamin C Kiwi
Vitamin C Sanddorn Beere
Vitamin C Paprika
Vitamin C Schwarze Johannisbeere
Vitamin C Grünkohl

Vitamin C deficiency

However, there are various factors that influence vitamin C absorption and can thus cause a deficiency. One risk group is smokers. They often have a lower vitamin C concentration in the blood plasma, despite a sufficient intake through food. But chronic inflammations in the body can also lead to a deficiency, since inflammations are usually accompanied by an increased need for this vitamin. A particularly frequent cause of vitamin C deficiency is gastrointestinal diseases with inflammation of the mucous membranes. These diseases are often responsible for the fact that vitamin C - which is absorbed in sufficient quantities through food - can no longer be absorbed by the intestinal mucous membranes and thus cannot be made available to the blood and the body cells.

If a vitamin C deficiency persists for a long time, it can result in the disease scurvy.

"In the beginning, symptoms such as fatigue, exhaustion and muscle weakness are rather unspecific.
If the vitamin C deficiency is already more pronounced, symptoms such as inflamed gums, poorer wound healing or joint pain appear. But a reduced ability to form collagen can also be a consequence. This leads to bleeding in the skin, internal organs, muscles, as well as the conjunctiva or retina. A vitamin C deficiency can be reliably detected by a blood test."

To prevent such a deficiency, a food supplement can be helpful. This leads to a healthy vitamin C supply in the body if the diet is not sufficiently healthy and varied.

Scurvy is a "seafarer's disease". In the past, seafarers were on sea voyages for weeks at a time and hardly had the opportunity to eat fresh fruit and vegetables. This resulted in a serious vitamin C deficiency.

The daily requirement of vitamin C

Is it possible to overdose on vitamin C?
A healthy person does not have to worry about an overdose. Too much vitamin C is excreted by the kidneys. For people who are physically weak, too much vitamin C can lead to diarrhoea. However, this can only be observed with very high amounts of vitamin C.

The recommended intake of vitamin C depends on age and gender. The German Nutrition Society recommends:

Kindern bis 4 Jahren 20 mg/ pro Tag 13 bis 15 Jahre 85 mg/  pro Tag Männlich 15 bis 19 Jahre 105 mg/ pro Tag Weiblichen 15 bis 19 Jahre 90 mg/ pro Tag Männer 110 mg/ pro Tag Frauen 95 mg/ pro Tag Schwangeren 105 mg/ pro Tag Stillenden 125 mg/ pro Tag  Raucherinnen 135 mg/ pro Tag Raucher 155 mg/ pro Tag

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU.

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Tisso Telefon+49 27 62 98 36 – 20 08

If you have any questions or would like to place an order, we are happy to help you personally.
You can reach us by phone from Monday - Friday 9:00 - 17:00 h.

Tisso WhatsApp +49 (0) 27 62 - 98 36 - 0

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Tisso Mail orders@tisso.de

You can email us at any time. We will reply within one working day.

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Coenzyme Q10


Author: Dr. Beate Fuchs ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎Published: 03. June 2020‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎|‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ Updated: 10. May 2021

 

Coenzyme Q10

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Why this coenzyme is so important for the body

Coenzyme Q10, also abbreviated as Q10, was known primarily through the cosmetic industry. However, it is important not only for our skin, but also for every one of the approximately 37 billion cells in our body. It is found in particular in the “powerhouses of the cells” ‒ the mitochondria ‒ where around 90% of all of the energy for our body is produced. And this energy is used for nearly all of the processes in our body – without energy, these processes cannot run.

Our body can form Q10 itself, however studies show that the body’s own Q10 production continuously decreases starting at around age 20. Moreover, stress, competitive sports, an unhealthy lifestyle, smoking, and taking certain medications, for example, can increase this process. Apart from a healthy diet, taking a nutritional supplement may be useful to systematically counteract a Q10 deficiency.

Why this coenzyme is so important for the body

Coenzym Q10
Ubiquinol and ubiquinone – the difference
Q10 effect
Q10 deficiency
Daily requirement of coenzyme Q10
Q10 foods

Coenzym Q10 Coenzyme Q10

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Coenzyme Q10 was discovered in 1955 and it is a fat-soluble, vitamin-like substance which can be produced by our body itself and which is also ingested through food. It is an odourless, tasteless crystalline substance which belongs to the ubiquinone family.

Q10 is found in all cells of the body and in the mitochondria in particular. Vital energy is formed in the mitochondria from food. Organs with a high energy requirement, such as the heart, brain, muscles, liver and kidneys, have a particularly high concentration of Q10.

Q10 is also notably present in membranes which surround the inside of cells and cell organelles like a shell. The exchange of substances such as sodium, potassium and calcium ions and the transfer of information, among other things, are regulated via these membranes. Q10 – along with the also valuable omega-3 fatty acids – largely determines the quality of the membranes.

Q10 ist in allen Körperzellen ‒ außer den roten Blutkörperchen ‒ zu finden und dort vor allem in den Mitochondrien. In diesen wird aus der Nahrung die lebenswichtige Energie gebildet. Organe mit einem hohen Energiebedarf wie Herz, Gehirn, Muskeln, Leber und Nieren weisen eine besonders hohe Konzentration an Q10 auf.

Ubiquinol und Ubiquinon – Unterschied Ubiquinol And Ubiquinone – The Difference

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Coenzyme Q10 is present in our body in two biochemical forms: in the oxidised form as ubiquinone which is conventionally also simply referred to as coenzyme Q10, and also as ubiquinol in the reduced form. Both forms play a role in energy production in the mitochondria. In other areas of the body, such as in the blood and lymph, around 90% of Q10 is present in the reduced form as ubiquinol.

In our body, Q10 is primarily formed in the liver, however this is also fundamentally possible in all other organs and tissues.

In a multistep process, Q10 arises in the form of ubiquinone from mevalonic acid and the amino acids tyrosine and methionine as well as with the aid of vitamins B3, B6, B12, folic acid and pantothenic acid.

During energy production in the mitochondria, ubiquinone, as a mobile transport molecule, can absorb electrons from one protein complex and transfer them to another. This results in ubiquinol which becomes ubiquinone once again after releasing the electrons and which is ready to absorb electrons again.

Q10-WirkungQ10 Effect

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Coenzyme Q10 is indispensable for the production of cell energy in the mitochondria. Here, energy is formed from the carbohydrates, fat and protein in food, together with oxygen, in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ‒ the body’s own “energy currency”. This energy is, so to speak, the fuel for our cells.

During this process, Q10 transfers electrons between two protein complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane and in doing so, it switches back and forth many times per second between the two forms of Q10, ubiquinone and ubiquinol. Without coenzyme Q10, the electron flow comes to a halt – the powerhouse of the cell then stands still.

The number of mitochondria in a cell of the body may greatly vary depending on the tissue and cell type. Cells which need a lot of energy also accordingly contain more mitochondria, e.g.:
• Liver cell: 500‒2.500
• Muscle cell: 2.000
• Nerve cell: 10.000
• Egg cell: > 100.000

The volume which the mitochondria occupy in the various cell types is also correspondingly different. This amount is, for example, a significant 36% in the case of heart muscle cells, and in liver cells, this is even 52% of the total cell volume. And the more mitochondria a cell has, the more Q10 it also contains.

Another interesting fact is that only a very small amount of the energy obtained (ATP) in the body can be stored and it therefore needs to be continuously formed anew. The amount of ATP which your cells use up on a daily basis corresponds to approximately your own body weight! Thus, if you weigh 70 kg, your cells form about 70 kg ATP every day.

Vitamin D3 WirkungQ10 Deficiency

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

A Q10 deficiency can develop because of various factors, for example due to:

  • Stress
  • Competitive sports
  • Weight-loss diets
  • Low-fat food
  • Smoking
  • Taking certain medications, such as cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) which can reduce the body’s own Q10 production
  • Inadequate intake of micronutrients which are needed for the body’s own Q10 formation (e.g. vitamin B3, B6, B12, folic acid, pantothenic acid, selenium, zinc)
  • A loss of Q10 in foods due to long transport and storage times, preservation, or extreme heating during cooking
  • The continuous reduction in the body’s own Q10 formation starting at around age 20

There is also an increased need for Q10 in the case of some diseases*, such as:

  • Burnout
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Migraines
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Gall bladder dysfunction
  • Bronchial asthma
  • Infertility

*This concerns an increased need, if applicable, and not the relief, cure or prevention of the disease.

Vitamin d3Daily Requirement Of Coenzyme Q10

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Q10 is formed by our body itself and also absorbed from food. We generally have about 0.5 to 2 g Q10 in our own body and in addition, around 5 to 10 mg should be absorbed from food every day. If there is an increased need for Q10, such as in the case of stress, competitive sports, and also with increasing age, it is recommended to consume Q10 at a dosage between 30 and 200 mg per day with a meal. From the age of 20, the body's own Q10 formation gradually decreases, so that an intake of 30 to 90 mg is recommended. If there is an increased need for Q10, such as in the case of stress and competitive sports, it is recommended to consume Q10 in a dosage of between 100 and 300 mg per day.
If you would like to know your coenzyme Q10 level, you can have it measured in your blood by your doctor or alternative practitioner.

The normal value is between 0.67 and 0.99 µg/ml blood. If you have an elevated cholesterol level or do not know this level exactly, then have your cholesterol-corrected coenzyme Q10 level measured in order to obtain a valid result. Q10 is present in the blood bound to cholesterol and thus high cholesterol values are automatically associated with higher Q10 values and may conceal a Q10 deficiency. In this measurement method, Q10 is correlated to cholesterol and should reach a value of at least 0.2 µmol/mmol cholesterol.

Vitamin d3 Q10 Foods: These Are The Best Sources Of Coenzyme Q10

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Q10 is found in various foods, in particular in the following:
• Meat (beef, poultry, liver)
• Fish (especially in sardines)
• Eggs
• Some vegetable oils
• Legumes
• Nuts and almonds
• Green vegetables

However it would be necessary to consume, for example, approx. 3 kg beef, 1.5 kg peanuts, 10 kg broccoli or about 60 avocados to meet the daily need. Therefore, to adequately supply the body, supplementation with a natural Q10 preparation is recommended in addition to a healthy diet. Studies show that, in healthy volunteers, administering 30 mg Q10 per day for 6 weeks can cause the cholesterol-corrected Q10 value to increase from 0.16 to 0.33 µmol/mmol cholesterol.

What is important when selecting a Q10 product?

Tisso Blatt Trennlinie Mitochondrien Sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe

Pay attention to high bioavailability! Conventional Q10 (ubiquinone) as a powder in a capsule is only very poorly absorbed by the intestine ‒ approximately 5 to 8% maximum. This is related to its crystalline structure, its molecule size and its properties as a fat-soluble substance. However, if ubiquinone is packaged by a water-soluble, natural “shell”, it can be absorbed by the body significantly better. This can be achieved, for example, through complexing with cyclodextrins ‒ special ring-shaped carbohydrates obtained from plant starch. Moreover, Q10 is absorbed by the body about 3 to 4 times better in its reduced form, that is, as ubiquinol, than as the oxidised form ubiquinone. However, ubiquinol is very sensitive to oxygen and easily oxidises back into ubiquinone. This is why ubiquinol should always be protected from oxidation in Q10 products and be stable as a result.

Favour natural production!
Q10 can be produced synthetically as well as naturally through fermentation. Natural production has the advantage that it contains exclusively Q10 in what is known as the trans-form which corresponds exactly to the body’s own Q10. By contrast, the synthetic form contains not only the trans-form but up to 50% is also the exogenous cis-form.

Use synergy effects!
In nature, substances always exist in combination and not in isolation since they mutually complement each other and together they achieve a higher synergistic effect than the individual substances in total. This is why it is recommended to look for a useful combination of substances when selecting a nutritional supplement.